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Published March 23, 2012, 11:06 AM

5 sisters of ‘Boomtown Girls’ reality show still waiting to hear about TV show

WILLISTON, N.D. - The girls of the “Boomtown Girls” are still waiting to hear if their chance at TV stardom will come true, but their first dose of reality show exposure has created a buzz in the boomtown.

By: Amy Dalrymple, Forum Communications Co.

WILLISTON, N.D. - The girls of the “Boomtown Girls” are still waiting to hear if their chance at TV stardom will come true, but their first dose of reality show exposure has created a buzz in the boomtown.

“Everyone is so excited,” said Kelsey Nehring said, one five sisters featured in “Boomtown Girls.”

A four-minute trailer for a potential “Boomtown Girls” reality show became an Internet sensation in North Dakota this winter.

“There’s been a little bit of negative feedback but not much,” she said in an interview this week. “People would like to see Williston get put on the map.”

The show is about Kelsey and the other Nehring sisters – Kendel (her married name is Hofer), LeAnna, Terrie and Heather – who work alongside men in the Oil Patch.

The “Boomtown Girls” trailer illustrates, through their lives, the growing pains – such as traffic, housing shortages and crime – that have come with huge economic opportunities and demand for oil field workers.

Andrew Lewis, a producer with Atlanta-based Lucky Dog Filmworks, said the company is in discussions with major cable networks to develop “Boomtown Girls.”

“We’ve had quite a bit of interest,” Lewis said.

Lewis declined to name the networks. He said producers are finalizing those discussions and sculpting the show to fit the networks’ interests.

Lewis, who has spent time in North Dakota developing man camps, said he was looking for an idea for a reality show about the oil boom when he discovered this family of sisters who grew up in the town that has attracted people – mostly men – looking for work in the oil fields.

“Just speaking for me, I wanted to share the point of view of a female working in Williston, in male-dominated society” said Kelsey, who works as a shop hand for an oil field fracking company during the day and tends bar at a strip club at night.

She said she loves her bar job, but when customers complain about life in Williston, she reminds them that the train station is just down the street.

“There’s the door, there’s the train. If you don’t like it, peace out ’cause I don’t want to hear it,” she says.

Crews have not been filming since the trailer was released, but the sisters have been keeping in touch with the producers and keeping in touch with each other, despite the mayhem of boomtown life.

“We have so much stuff to talk about now,” said Kelsey, who lives with Kendel. “If this does good, we have to stay close.

“Our one big fear of the show is that it would tear us apart.”

The sisters were reluctant to agree to the idea because they were afraid the show would attempt to be salacious or distort reality.

“We were a little apprehensive,” Kelsey says. “You’re opening up your lives to the world.”

“They were really not seeking any celebrity status,” Lewis said. “If they couldn’t be who they are, they had no interest in doing the show.”

But the producers assured the girls they were interested in doing a show that was genuine.

Lewis said he has great admiration for the girls and considers them the heroes of America.

“I think these girls could be a great example for the rest of the country,” Lewis said.


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Amy Dalrymple and Jeff Beach write for Forum Communications Co.

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