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Man’s gift to Williston: Affordable senior housing

Man’s gift to Williston: Affordable senior housing

WILLISTON, N.D. -- Preservation was Earl Westereng’s No. 1 goal when he bought the old Williston High School in 2005. He and his partner’s bid of $33,133 was the highest of three for the 1931 building that had been left vacant in the city’s downtown area.

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Texas company looking at Bakken pipeline market

WILLISTON, N.D. -- A Texas-based company is looking to enter the Bakken crude oil shipping business. Enterprise Products Partners of Houston is seeking customer commitments for its proposed crude oil pipeline from the Williston Basin in North Dakota to the Cushing hub in Oklahoma.

Oil output up again but flaring percentage drops

BISMARCK -- Oil and gas production in North Dakota continued setting records in July, with oil up 18,000 barrels a day from June and a 3 percent increase in gas production. The preliminary oil production figure for July is just over 1.1 million barrels per day, according to figures released Friday by the state.

Faces of the boom: Veteran trucker sees challenges of Oil Patch driving

Faces of the boom: Veteran trucker sees challenges of Oil Patch driving

WILLISTON, N.D. -- Darrel Harris is something of a Renaissance man. The 62-year-old truck driver from Milton-Freewater, Ore., has worked as a teacher, commercial fisherman and for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He even managed an auto parts store in southeast Asia for five years.

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NDSU rail shipment study withdrawn in May

North Dakota State University staff confirms a preliminary study of rail shipment delays was withdrawn days after it was released, but the withdrawal has only recently gotten attention. The study, which estimated the amount money North Dakota farmers have lost to ongoing rail delays, was pulled in May days after it was published, according to professor William Wilson.

U.S. lawmakers fault rail sector for slow service

Heitkamp calls for more federal power for Surface Transportation Board
WASHINGTON -- U.S. rail operators must put investment ahead of profits to clear the way for grain, automotive and chemical shipments now clogging the tracks, lawmakers said at a congressional hearing Wednesday about the health of the rail grid. Rail backups in the Midwest are particularly acute with farmers expected to harvest record large corn and soybean crops over the next two months and move much of that grain to market.

U.S. promises new look at oil train dangers, acknowledges test flaws

WASHINGTON -- U.S. studies of oil train dangers may have underestimated the perils of volatile vapor in the railcars and officials will in the future use precision instruments for more thorough tests, a Transportation Department official said Tuesday. Officials have warned since January that flammable gas might be moving with crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken region, but government studies have largely agreed with industry-funded reports that such fuel is fit to move in standard tank cars. However, past studies were incomplete and future fuel samples will be drawn using what is known as a syringe cylinder that better detects flammable gas, said Timothy Butters of the Transportation Department's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

Facing staffing shortage, Early Head Start in Dickinson temporarily closes its center

DICKINSON, N.D. -- One of Dickinson's few child care options has had to close its doors. The Early Head Start program, part of the North Dakota Head Start Association and managed in part by the Community Action Partnership, temporarily closed its center after five of six teachers on staff resigned over the summer, Early Head Start assistant director Jennifer Braun said Monday. Like many organizations in Dickinson and southwest North Dakota, Early Head Start has struggled to keep up with higher oil industry wages and rising cost of living. "We have to compete with oilfields," Braun said, "and we're a federally funded program."

Faces of the Boom: Weighing her options in the Bakken: Woman who moved from Tennessee ready to put down roots

Faces of the Boom: Weighing her options in the Bakken: Woman who moved from Tennessee ready to put down roots

NEW TOWN, N.D. -- Megan English was working at an automotive factory before she came to western North Dakota and more than doubled her hourly wage.

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Dickinson train derailment closes tracks for 3 hours; no one injured

Dickinson train derailment closes tracks for 3 hours; no one injured

DICKINSON, N.D. -- Four flatbed railcars and a boxcar derailed Saturday morning in Dickinson.

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Tour de North Dakota: International travel professionals visit state to market trips back home

Tour de North Dakota: International travel professionals visit state to market trips back home

RICHARDTON, N.D. -- It’s no New York City, but North Dakota, along with its Upper Midwest neighbors, is slowly gaining prominence as a popular international tourist destination.

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Tide turns on brain drain: Ample jobs create room for people to return to N.D.

Tide turns on brain drain: Ample jobs create room for people to return to N.D.

FARGO – Chris and Jamie Zink fit the definition of the “brain drain” – young, college-educated North Dakotans who left the state for job opportunities elsewhere. Following graduation in 2000, they headed for the St. Louis area, where both earned master’s degrees and worked.

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Investment in affordability: Minot affordable housing effort modeled after Grand Forks group

MINOT, N.D. — Carrie Welnel has a “zombie list.” It’s a list of houses in Minot that were damaged by the 2011 Souris River flood and then left abandoned and unrepaired, earning them the name “zombie homes” among Minot residents.

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Oil boom, flood recovery boost Minot housing demand

Oil boom, flood recovery boost Minot housing demand

MINOT, N.D. — Dennis Roerick remembers it as the worst Father’s Day of his life. It was June 19, 2011, when he and his wife, JoAnn, heard warnings on the 10 p.m. news about the rising Souris River.

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Postal Service says it won’t cut hours at 30 ‘Bakken’ post offices

BISMARCK, N.D. – The U.S. Postal Service pledged Thursday to maintain current hours at 30 post offices in central and western North Dakota, contrary to a recent agency report that suggested other plans. North Dakota’s two U.S. senators, Democrat Heidi Heitkamp and Republican John Hoeven, said the Postal Service promised them in March and April that hours wouldn’t be cut at 30 post offices previously slated for service hour reductions in what the agency described as the Bakken oil region, though not all of the post offices are in oil-producing areas.

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