Your online source for western North Dakota and oil news

Supply and demand: In a booming economy, businesses compete for potential employees

Help wanted” signs have become almost as ubiquitous as pickup trucks and oil rigs in booming Dickinson, with everyone from Menards to McDonald’s looking to hire. But while the demand is there, supply has yet to catch up.

N.D. shuts down handler of radioactive oilfield waste for violations in Killdeer

BISMARCK — The North Dakota Department of Health has ordered a company that handles radioactive oilfield waste to shut down its facility near Killdeer after state inspectors found several violations there earlier this month.

Oil Patch truck driver charged with illegal dumping

WILLISTON, N.D. – Criminal charges have been filed against a truck driver accused of illegally dumping oilfield waste in western North Dakota, and the trucking company he worked for could face more than $1 million in civil penalties, officials said Tuesday.

Pipeline leaks saltwater in Badlands

MEDORA, N.D. – Continental Resources will submit a plan to clean up a pipeline leak that spilled about 560 barrels of saltwater in the Badlands about 10 miles south of here, the North Dakota Department of Health said.

Oil Patch truck driver charged with illegal dumping

WILLISTON, N.D. – Criminal charges have been filed against a truck driver accused of illegally dumping oilfield waste in western North Dakota, and the trucking company he worked for could face more than $950,000 in civil penalties for repeat offenses, officials said Tuesday.

Newcomers enter race to lead boomtown

Newcomers enter race to lead boomtown

WILLISTON, N.D. – Williston is the fastest-growing small city in America, and two among the thousands of new residents want to be the town’s mayor. Entrepreneur Marcus Jundt, who moved to Williston to open restaurants, and archaeologist Jim Purkey, whose family moved to North Dakota after job layoffs, are challenging city commissioner and lifelong Williston resident Howard Klug for mayor. Mayor Ward Koeser, who will retire in June after 20 years as mayor, said he’s pleased to see new Williston residents getting involved in local elections.

RELATED CONTENT

FOTB: Baseball is back: Ray adding activities with rising enrollment

FOTB: Baseball is back: Ray adding activities with rising enrollment

RAY — The high school here has a baseball team for the first time since the 1970s, supported by a growing school enrollment and a “baseball fanatic” superintendent.

RELATED CONTENT

Farmers still desperate for rail service

Farmers still desperate for rail service

The slow rail service threatening the livelihood of farmers in the Upper Midwest has gotten better in recent weeks, but at the Forest River Bean Co., the railcars ordered from BNSF or Canadian Pacific are still two to three months behind, said the company president.

RELATED CONTENT

560-barrel pipeline leak reported south of Medora

MEDORA, N.D. – A pipeline has leaked about 560 barrels of production fluid 10 miles south of here, the North Dakota Department of Health reported Saturday.

N.D. oil production up slightly in Feb, but still slowed by winter

WILLISTON, N.D. – North Dakota oil production increased 1.7 percent in February to 951,340 barrels per day, according to preliminary numbers released today by the Department of Mineral Resources.

Owners say land protections ‘failing miserably’

Owners say land protections ‘failing miserably’

Legislative committee hears testimony on damage from oil development
MINOT, N.D. – Darwin Peterson is the third member of what he hopes is a fifth-generation farm. But the Bottineau County man worries about the quality of land he’ll be able to pass on to his grandson after it was damaged by saltwater, a byproduct of oil development, when a pipeline ruptured in 2011. Peterson told a legislative committee Tuesday this will be the third season he’s unable to plant on the cropland that was affected by the spill, and remediation efforts by the company responsible have had limited results.

RELATED CONTENT

FACES OF THE BOOM: Family from Washington state grows attached to North Dakota

FACES OF THE BOOM: Family from Washington state grows attached to North Dakota

POWERS LAKE, N.D. – When Carolynn Robinson and her husband moved from Washington state to North Dakota to work in the oilfields, they thought it would just be a summer gig. But the move worked out so well, they decided to stay. “We’re getting more and more attached to North Dakota,” said Robinson, who moved to the state about two years ago. Lack of work in their home state prompted them to move to North Dakota.

RELATED CONTENT

Refineries gaining steam: Capacity a ‘drop in the ocean’ compared to ND output

WILLISTON — While the United States hasn’t seen a new refinery in more than 30 years, North Dakota has five refineries proposed that range from planning stages to active construction.

Pipe dreams? Shipping crude by pipeline has future in Bakken despite a formidable competitor

Pipe dreams? Shipping crude by pipeline has future in Bakken despite a formidable competitor

DICKINSON — As crude oil pipelines play catch-up, they need more than to just build out the capacity to compete with rail — they need to be strategic about it.

RELATED CONTENT

Meeting set to gather input on reducing gas flaring

BISMARCK, N.D. – A special hearing is set for April 22 to provide input on reducing natural gas flaring to the Oil and Gas Division of the state Department of Mineral Resources. The input gathered at the one-day hearing, as well as through written comments that can be submitted, will be considered as the North Dakota Industrial Commission moves forward with a newly adopted plan to reduce flaring.

RELATED CONTENT
View More Oil Articles